3D objects are more than three dimensional

OK the title is maybe a little heavy handed. The experience I wanted to convey is that the object stored in the form of a computer based description may be utilised for more than the single output process.

The range of technological developments enabling object creation, such as 3D printing, is part of the object creation process. Advances in object capture and creation has accelerated too. These go hand-in-hand.

3D scanner

3D scanner

3D printer

3D printer

This combo may be better illustrated with a computer placed between them but it seems clear this is analogous to the relationship between a camera and a printer. The capture process is very similar to photography, being an optical process; the result is a record of the subject.

image of young girl illustrating 3D scanning capture process

The parallel with photography continues through the image handling and into the output of a physical representation.

All seemingly obvious.

But it’s new. And powerful.

3D printing is a mechanical process. What goes into that process however relies on imagination, skills and marvels in technological achievement; on repeatable and flexible bases. Or, putting it another way, one may capture an object and use it as one would a 2D image; one may give the object the ‘Photoshop’ treatment (just not in Photoshop!)

CG Model

CG Model

3/4 View Photo of Real Object

3/4 View Photo of Real Object

Side View Photo of Real Object

Side View Photo of Real Object

This can be repeated, in different versions, in different materials, using different processes, from now on. The captured image lasts. So long as a good backup policy is maintained on the data (something I’m very careful of), the captured image is preserved for prosperity.

Who knows what technology these images may be applied to in the future?

As a quick note: it is worth mentioning here that Living Artifact Design maintains a policy of personal privacy. Images and indeed objects will never be recreated without the prior permission of the image owner.